Tag Archive | Yorkshire

Three Peaks Challenge – what happens if you have to drop out and there is no back up.

Penyghent at Dawn

I originally published this blog last September but now that the 2016 Three Peaks season is well on its way I thought it was worth republishing and updating any links

If you are planning to do the Yorkshire Three Peaks then there are lots of things you need to consider. The “What happens if I cannot complete the walk” is well worth thinking about too, even if you are going on an organised event.

Whenever you go for a walk whether short or long you should consider the “what ifs” and have an escape route or plan. On the best Three Peaks walks you will have someone in a vehicle acting as support. They can carry spare water and snacks as well as pick up anyone who has maybe injured themselves or who knows they cannot complete the walk. There are two or three places where the support vehicle can meet you to check everyone is ok. It can be a thankless and boring job but the walkers will get a real boost seeing them between the peaks and knowing they have backup if needed.

Some organised walks tell you to carry a mobile phone and have some money on 20140614_120457you for a taxi or the train in case you are not keeping up or want to drop out. You maybe doing the walk with a few friends and not have anyone to provide a back up for you. A point to remember is that mobiles do not work at the road heads of Birkwith, Ribblehead and Chapel-le-Dale and the only public phone box is at the Station Inn at Ribblehead. There are taxis around here but they can be very busy, at peak times particularly, so you will need some money for a pint or two while you wait for one. The Hill Inn between Whernside and Ingleborough is available for drinks while you wait too.  Make sure you have the taxi numbers with you so you can call where you have a signal though. There are some trains at Ribblehead on the famous Settle Carlisle Railway so you can check the timetable.  There are also some buses but they are not that regular especially out of season but the Dales Bus has information. Dales Bus. Make sure you have this information with you before you set off.

Map and CompassWe are seeing more and more people walking along the roads, especially coming back down to Horton-in-Ribblesdale from Ribblehead. Perhaps they do not have any money or would rather not pay. Walking on the road is very hard on your feet and legs and is just under 5 1/2 miles long.  It has no verge to walk on most of the way, is quite narrow and winding and has numerous blind bends and summits. It is well used by tourist and local cars and cycles but it is also well know for being a popular motorbike route and has more than its fair share of riders who think they will live forever despite riding too fast and overtaking when they cannot see. Unfortunately we have also had more than our share of serious injuries and deaths too which is very sad. All in all this road is potentially very dangerous for walkers and is not the best route back to Horton-in-Ribblesdale either.

The Alternative – The easiest on your tired legs and feet is to follow the Three Peaks walk to High Birkwith and then take the Ribble Way to Sell Gill to join the Pennine Way down to Horton. At just under 6 1/4 miles it is a bit longer but far more pleasant and much, much safer.  Another idea is to follow the much less busy road down to the village from High Birkwith and this route is just over 6 miles but again much safer.

If you plan for the possibility of having to drop out of the walk and the unlikely happens then it does not mean that the day is totally spoilt by you having to work out what to do in a place with no signal and when you have no money or planned options.

Enjoy your walking. If you need a to develop your navigation skills, a guide or safety  cover for any walk, including the Three Peaks, please get in touch Contact Us

Paul Rose on BBC Pennine Way programme goes caving with us.

Sean and Paul Rose after filming for BBC Pennine Way.Back in late November we received a call from the BBC who were producing the Pennine Way programme currently showing on BBC 1 in the North on Fridays at 7.30 pm.  Dave had been talking to Lucy from the production team earlier in the year but we understood there might not be enough room for a caving trip so thought that was that.  The call in November was to ask us if we could take Paul Rose the presenter caving in a few days. They realised, as they began filming, there was enough great material to fill another episode to make it last for 4 weeks.  Dave was on holiday so we asked Sean Whittle, who works with us regularly, if he was available and luckily he was. A star is born!

It is a great series and is available on the BBC iPlayer as well as still running for another 2 weeks on BBC1. We understand in the future it will be showing nationwide on BBC2.

Here is the link to the episode with Sean in and it also includes great footage of Malham Show, Climbing at Malham Cove, Pen-y-ghent Cafe and the Three Peaks.  Well worth a watch.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b05qt6vr/the-pennine-way-episode-2

So if you fancy trying caving with us then get in touch. We have holiday evening caving trips that individuals, families and small groups can join in, you can join a course or you can book your own instructor for a day and time convenient for you. We also run navigation courses for those of you that might want to tackle the Pennine Way or maybe just parts of it.

The Salmon are leaping up the River Ribble

Salmon jumping at Stainforth on the River Ribble

Salmon jumping at Stainforth on the River Ribble

Salmon jumping at Stainforth on the River Ribble

Salmon jumping at Stainforth on the River Ribble

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It is the time of the year for the Salmon to be heading up river to lay their eggs. The salmon is an anadromous fish. This means it is a fish that is born in fresh water, spends most of its life in the sea and returns to fresh water to spawn. I did know that but I must admit I had to look the word up. But did you know a catadromous fish does the opposite – lives in fresh water and enters salt water to spawn?

At each stage of the life cycle of the salmon distinct changes take place. Apparently it was not until the first part of the 19th century that it was proven that the adult Atlantic salmon was the same species as the striped parr found in the rivers. The Atlantic Salmon Trust have a great slide show that explains all the different stages

http://www.atlanticsalmontrust.org/salmon-life-cycle-habitat-threats-and-concerns.html

I went down to Stainforth Force with Smudge on Saturday morning to watch this incredible sight. The force of the river dropping down the falls that they have to leap into is amazing. If you get the chance to see this feat sometime it is well worth the visit usually during October each year.

Here is a short piece of film I put on our Facebook page.

 

 

 

Holiday Evening Caving Trips have started for 2014

For several years now we have been running Introductory Caving Trips suitable for individuals, couples and small groups during the holiday periods from February until October half term. (Dates at the end of the blog)

The caves are not tight and you can walk in many sections. There are some stooping and crawling sections and even a few optional squeezes if you would like but they are not compulsory if you are worried about that. There are some deep pools to get around, waterfalls and small climbs but nothing that an averagely fit person with a sense of adventure will not be able to do. It’s a great chance to do something a bit different with some of your family or friends in an area famous for its caves.

These Caving Trips start at 5.00 pm and finish at approximately 8.00 pm so not too late for the younger ones and time to go for a bar snack locally afterwards if you want.

Happy Young Cavers

Happy Young Cavers

Your local, qualified and very experienced instructor will meet you at the parking place nearest the cave just above Horton-in-Ribblesdale and directions to the site will be given on booking.

Everyone will change into the caving kit at the road head and walk a short distance to the cave before going underground.

We supply – Caving oversuits, helmets, lights, belts, wellies, and all safety gear. We will supply you with a simple kit list on booking but it will not include the need for any specialist clothes. You will  need a full change of clothes for afterwards though as you will be getting a bit wet.

The minimum age is 8 years old. As we are an AALA  licensed provider we can take children under 18 without a parent or legal guardian being with us. We just need their written consent or verbal if you are bringing your own child to the caving venue. No company that charges you can take under 18s on their own without having this license as it is a legal requirement to ensure their safety. 

The price is £25.00 per person. You can book and pay online or use our contact page to email or phone us.

2014 DATES Mon  14th April  ~  Mon  21st April ~ Mon 5th May ~ Sun 25th May ~ Mon  26th May ~ Mon  21st July ~ Mon  28th July ~ Mon 4th Aug ~ Mon 11th Aug ~ Mon 18th Aug ~ Mon 25th Aug ~ Mon 1st Sept ~ Mon 8th Sept ~ Mon 20th Oct ~ Mon 27th Oct.

 

 

Navigation Training at your Leisure.

I was tidying up a few days ago and I found some lovely feedback I got from a participant on one of our two day NNAS Navigation Skills Courses a few years ago. It was quite a long note but the piece that made me think more was this.

“….Right from the start she made us feel relaxed and was extremely patient. I really enjoyed her company and was so pleased to find a normal person leading the course! I was afraid I would be trained by a gung-ho youngster, but instead I found our trainer was a really, really nice woman who didn’t care that I amble up hills. This course is very woman friendly (well everyone friendly, actually) and avoids any competition. Participants are not judged by their physical appearance and you won’t feel intimidated……”

Beck at Gordale Scar

Beck at Gordale Scar

It was nice to be called “normal” under these circumstances as I think I am! Everybody can get involved in navigation from all ages to a wide range of abilities. Over the years we have had triathlon competitors, ultra runners to women who are out walking their dogs on their own. I often fall into that category.

The point I want to make is that you do not need to be super-fit and you do not need to climb mountains to enjoy the feelings of freedom and adventure that you can get when out exploring the countryside with your map and compass.  In fact the fresh air and exercise, at whatever level, can help your fitness, reduce your stress and allow you to get some perspective in your life.  I love to go out walking and having some time away from work and other commitments. It works for me, every time.

Teaching how to take a bearing off the map.

Navigation skills can be taught all year round.

You do not need to be going very far, or very high to see beautiful views in the Yorkshire Dales but being able to read a map and use a compass confidently is essential to your enjoyment and safety.  Learning these skills with us can be done at a pace to suit you. I do not like having to worry about keeping up with other people especially when I am trying to learn. Your sole purpose becomes trying not to be left behind or look bad which is no state of mind for you to learn in. Gaining navigation skills is not about speed. Yes, there are elements when you need to time yourself covering a distance but that is about you learning what your speed is so you can make estimates on ground covered when you are the navigator.

None or our navigation  events are rushed but we thought that some people might like to come to the Yorkshire Dales to learn and develop their map and compass skills in a more leisurely way and one where they have also have time to spend exploring the area on their own. With this in mind we will be running a three day midweek Navigation Skills at your Leisure event on Monday 19th, Tuesday 20th & Wednesday 21st May. Each morning there will be 4 hours of skills training in a different place each time and then you will be free to explore the area on your own or relax at where you are staying. We can recommend different places for all budgets that welcome walkers and muddy boots. The 3 days will be a NNAS Bronze/Silver Course which is accredited with a certificate and badge on successful completion. If you do not want any form of assessment that will be entirely up to you so do not be put off. The cost of the three days is £126.00 and this will include a local, qualified and experienced instructor, the loan of a map and compass for the duration and a badge and certificate at the end. Want to know more? Contact me on 01729 824455 or email pam@yorkshiredalesguides.co.uk

Cannot do those dates?  If you like the idea of doing some training over a longer period but these dates are not suitable please get in touch as we can usually arrange other dates to suit. Don’t forget Yorkshire Dales Guides does not have any minimum numbers so once one person has booked on any of our events it will go ahead. There is nothing worse than making all your accommodation and travel arrangements to find out your course has been cancelled! Not with us.

Navigation in Summer

Time for some planning

Lost Sheep in Yellow Jerseys all over the Yorkshire Dales

Lost Sheep in Yellow Jerseys all over the Yorkshire Dales

Lost Sheep in Yellow Jerseys all over the Yorkshire Dales
Over 350 Lost Sheep in Yellow Jerseys – Over 150 prizes!
Spot 3 different sheep, tell Dales Discoveries, and you could win great prizes!
Enter as many times as you like before 5th September. Click on photo for more details.

Summit of Fountains Fell

Summit of Fountains Fell

Summit of Fountains Fell last Wednesday. Clear blue skies but misty and murky all day in the valleys. Just shows you why its worth getting up that little bit higher. You can see Pen-y-ghent, Ingleborough and Whernside in the distance with all the cloud in the valley. If we looked southwards we could just see Pendle peeping out too.

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